Honi Sanders

Honi Sanders

Postdoctoral Associate – Neuroscience

Center for Brains, Minds, and Machines

MIT

Biography

I am a postdoc in the labs of Matthew Wilson and Samuel Gershman. I’m interested in how the brain bootstraps its experiences into knowledge that can be used to organize and learn from future experiences. My work uses computational approaches such as probabilistic inference to create hypotheses about biological learning in the brain. I also collect and analyze data from rodent hippocampus.

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Interests
  • Computational Neuroscience
  • Probabilistic Inference
  • Hippocampus
Education
  • Ph.D. in Neuroscience, 2016

    Brandeis University

  • S.B. in Mathematics and Computational Neuroscience, 2010

    University of Chicago

Experience

 
 
 
 
 
MIT - Lab of Matt Wilson; Harvard - Lab of Sam Gershman
Postdoctoral Associate
MIT - Lab of Matt Wilson; Harvard - Lab of Sam Gershman
Jan 2016 – Present
  • Probabilistic inference model of animal context identification
  • Calcium Imaging
  • Data analysis of rodent hippocampal neural recordings
 
 
 
 
 
Brandeis University - Lab of John Lisman
Ph.D. Student
Brandeis University - Lab of John Lisman
Aug 2010 – Jan 2016 California
  • Biologically realistic neural network simulations
  • Theory of navigation computation - place cells and grid cells
  • Data analysis of rodent hippocampal neural recordings

Recent Publications

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(2021). Animal-to-animal variability in hippocampal remapping. bioRxiv.

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(2020). Hippocampal remapping as hidden state inference. eLife.

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(2020). Efficient Inference in Structured Spaces. Cell.

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(2019). Temporal coding and rate remapping: Representation of nonspatial information in the hippocampus. Hippocampus.

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(2015). Grid cells and place cells: an integrated view of their navigational/memory function. Trends in Neurosciences.

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(2014). A network that performs brute-force conversion of a temporal sequence to a spatial pattern: relevance to odor recognition. Frontiers in Computational Neuroscience.

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(2013). NMDA and GABAB (KIR) Conductances: The "Perfect Couple" for Bistability. Journal of Neuroscience.

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